Global Education Monitoring Report 2020 | UPSC

Global Education Monitoring Report 2020 UPSC

Global Education Monitoring Report 2020 | UPSC

      HEADLINES:

Education gap widened

      WHY IN NEWS:

‘School closures due to pandemic have interrupted student support mechanisms’- UNESCO

SYLLABUS COVERED: GS 3:Education : Reports

      LEARNING: 

For PRELIMS go through the title and aim of this report . This is easy to understand report . Aspirants buckle up your shoes and remember your school days too .

For MAINS jump to this video and take a note from key takeaways !

      ISSUE: 

The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated inequalities in education systems across the world.

Education makes an essential contribution to building inclusive and democratic societies, where differences of opinion can be freely expressed and where the wide range of voices can be heard, in pursuit of social cohesion and in a celebration of diversity.

2020 GLOBAL EDUCATION MONITORING REPORT ANALYSIS :

Global Education Monitoring Report 2020 UPSC IASbhai
Children who depend on the free noon meals at school are among the badly-hit.

TITLE :

Inclusion and education: ALL MEANS ALL

PUBLISHED BY :

  Hmm.. certainly UNESCO ! But Do not forget the commitment#Education for all .

AIM :

The Report is aimed to inform education and aid policy through analysis of the challenges facing countries.

AUDIENCES :

While the prime audience consists of decision-makers such as ministers, policymakers, parliamentarians and education planners, other groups such as civil society, teachers, non-governmental organizations, university researchers and the media are important.

KEY TAKEAWAYS :

  • EXCLUSION TRENDS : About 40% of low- and lower-middle-income countries have not supported learners at risk of exclusion during this crisis, such as the poor, linguistic minorities and learners with disabilities.
  • DISRUPTED LEARNING : Efforts to maintain learning continuity during the pandemic may have actually worsened exclusion trends.
  • ATTENDANCE : During the height of school closures in April 2020, almost 91% of students around the world were out of school.
  • ONLINE EDUCATION : “Education systems responded with distance learning solutions, all of which offered less or more imperfect substitutes for classroom instruction,”.
  • DIGITAL MAKEOVER : While many poorer countries opted for radio and television lessons.

  55% of low-income, 73% of lower-middle-income and 93% of upper-middle-income countries adopted for online learning platforms for primary and secondary education.

  • DIGITAL DIVIDE : “Even as governments increasingly rely on technology, the digital divide lays bare the limitations in this approach.
  • ACCESS TO INTERNET : Not all students and teachers have access to adequate internet connection, equipment, skills and working conditions to take advantage of available platforms.
  • LEARNING HINDERANCE : School closures also interrupted support mechanisms from which many disadvantaged learners benefit.
  • LACK OF RESOURCES : Resources for blind and deaf students may not be available outside schools, while children with learning disabilities or those who are on the autism spectrum may struggle with independent work in front of a computer or the disruption of daily school routines.
  • POOR STUDENTS : For poor students who depend on school for free meals or even free sanitary napkins, closures have been a major blow.
  • RESULT MATTERS ! Cancellation of examinations in many countries, including India, may result in scoring dependent on teachers’ judgements of students instead, which could be affected by stereotypes of certain types of students.
  • DROP OUT RATE : Higher drop-out rates are also a concern; during an earlier Ebola epidemic in Africa, many older girls never returned to school once the crisis was over.
  • RECRUITMENT DRIVE : 17% of low and middle-income countries are planning to recruit more teachers, 22% to increase class time and 68% to introduce remedial classes when schools reopen.

      IASbhai WINDUP: 

We need to teach children to deal with differences, not as a negative thing, but as something we can all learn from to be better people, better students and better citizens.

If we don’t push for accessibility and inclusion in schools, we are choosing to raise entire generations believing that segregation is a viable solution to the ‘problem’ of the existence of diverse individuals.

     SOURCES:THE HINDU | Global Education Monitoring Report 2020 | UPSC

DISCOVER MORE : Important Reports and Analysis for Prelims 2020

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